Jenna Mead, who has coached the Stanhope Elmore Lady Mustangs resigned last week, but will remain at the school as a teacher and volleyball coach.
Jenna Mead, who has coached the Stanhope Elmore Lady Mustangs resigned last week, but will remain at the school as a teacher and volleyball coach.

Mead resigns as Mustangs’ softball coach

Published 6:11pm Thursday, May 30, 2013

When the Stanhope Elmore softball team takes the field for the 2014 season, a new skipper will be leading the club. Jenna Mead, coach of the Lady Mustangs for the past four seasons announced her resignation May 24, but will remain with the school as a tenured teacher and volleyball coach.

“It was just time to give someone else a shot,” said Mead, who holds a coaching mark of 59-36-3 after coaching the Mustangs’ 2011, 2012 and 2013 seasons. “I don’t want to not coach softball, but it was just the right time to step down.”

Mead, who started her coaching career as an assistant on Wilbur Terrell’s Lady Panthers’ staff,  steps aside after a successful run that saw the Lady Mustangs grow and improve both their onfield product and their facilities.

“We went from having to use a trailer as a dressing room to having a really nice fieldhouse,” said Mead.

Two years ago, Stanhope Elmore finished in the top two of the area tournament and advanced to regionals, winning their first postseason game since the early 1990s.

“Even this year, I know it didn’t end like we wanted it too,” said Mead. “But we beat Northview and Thompson and Prattville and we know how good those teams are.”

Mead is confident the Lady Mustangs team she’s leaving behind is built to take that next step, despite this season’s early exit in the area tournament.

“Whoever comes in is going to have the best team ever to take the field from this school,” said Mead. “They are going to be state bound if they are coached right. I’ve done everything I possibly could to get them this far. I’m leaving something really good for someone to come in and take over.”

In her final year as Stanhope Elmore’s skipper, four of her five seniors inked letters to play collegiate softball.

 

Editor's Picks