Indians’ Kennedy ranked No. 1 center prospect in nation

Published 3:40pm Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Brandon Kennedy ended spring practice on top.
In the latest Rivals250 rankings released last week, the Wetumpka rising senior offensive lineman graded out as the No. 1 high school center in the country.
The Atlantic Coast Conference trio of Georgia Tech, Duke and Virginia Tech all extended scholarship offers to Kennedy since he returned to the field for spring drills–raising the lineman’s offer total to 21.

Brandon Kennedy, 73, blocks a Central-Phenix City lineman during Wetumpka's spring jamboree earlier this month. Photo by Cory Diaz
Brandon Kennedy, 73, blocks a Central-Phenix City lineman during Wetumpka’s spring jamboree earlier this month. Photo by Cory Diaz

“It’s an honor have that title (of the country’s top center prospect), but I can’t think about it too much,” Kennedy said. “I cannot let it get in my head, I’ve got to stay level-headed.”
Andrew Bone, Alabama high school recruiting analyst for Rivals.com, attributed the Wetumpka native’s performance at prospect camps and the spring for his ascent to the top of the position list.
“He is a technician on the offensive line,” Bone said. “He understands hand placement. He is very strong and quick off the ball. He won every one-on-one battle during the (Rivals Camp in Birmingham). There was a lot of talent at the camp including five-star defensive tackle Daron Payne from Shades Valley High School, who Kennedy defeated in the one-on-ones.
“His performance really took him to the next level, and that is why he is considered one of the elite prospects, not only in Alabama, but in the Southeast.”
According to Bone, what has separated the consensus four-star center recruit that has taken the bulk on his prep snaps at other positions on the line is his passion and intensity.
“He was a beginner at the center position when he arrived at the Rivals Camp. He showcased excellent technical skills, strength and power,” Bone said. “One of his best assets is that he will finish plays.  He doesn’t stop until the whistle blows.”
Kennedy credited his coaches at Wetumpka and the camps, as well as the competitors, for the work it took to learn the center position, which makes him a prize prospect for many schools.
“I think it’s pretty good to know multiple positions and it’ll help me help a team out,” Kennedy said. “If they need me to learn multiple positions I can. It’s also a possibility of me getting on the field early. I can go in there and sub for them. It’s an asset for me as I go into my senior year here at Wetumpka and into college.”
As a team, Kennedy thought the Indians exceeded expectations this spring, but said he could’ve done better. For Bone, the 6-foot-2, 295-pound lineman’s biggest area of improvement is his size.
“A lot of people would consider that good size, but playing center in a conference (like) the SEC is a different animal,” Bone said. “Defensive linemen are 330-350-pounds. They are strong, quick and also know how to use their hands. Kennedy will need to get bigger and continue to develop himself as a center.”
With unofficial visits scheduled at Tennessee and Clemson so far this summer, Kennedy plans to choose a college destination before his senior year with the Tribe. The lineman has no favorites, but knows what’s he looking for.
“My relationship with the coaches and how I feel at the (school),” Kennedy said. “Whether I’m comfortable or not will help me decide which school I’ll be attending for next three, four years.”

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